Archive for October, 2011

October 23, 2011

A different kind of performance: Tacita Dean

This is a quick test, messing around trying to get to grips with iMovie……still a lot to learn!


FILM is an 11-minute silent 35mm film by Tacita Dean, projected onto a gigantic white monolith standing 13 metres tall at the end of a darkened Turbine Hall. It is the first work in The Unilever Series devoted to the moving image, and celebrates the masterful techniques of analogue film-making as opposed to digital. The work evokes the monumental mysterious black monolith from the classic science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey. The film feels like a surreal visual poem, including images from the natural world among others, with the epic wall of the Turbine Hall showing through, in a montage of black and white, colour, and hand-tinted film.

Tacita Dean is a British artist now based in Berlin, best known for her use of film. Dean’s films act as portraits or depictions rather than conventional cinematic storytelling, capturing fleeting natural light or subtle shifts in movement. Her static camera positions and long takes allow events to unfold unhurriedly. Other works have attempted to reconstruct events from memory, such as an infamous thwarted attempt to circumnavigate the world.

Many of Dean’s works show the ways in which architecture can be transformed by the camera’s lens. Craneway Event 2009 follows the choreographer Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) and his dance company rehearsing in a former Ford assembly plant, built of glass and steel and overlooking the San Francisco Bay. Dean’s film allows the ever-changing light of this environment to fall in rhythm with the dancers’ movements.

Read more here.

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October 22, 2011

Lucinda Childs


Just got back from seeing the 1979 revival of DANCE by Lucinda Childs and the movie Lucinda Childs by French director Patrick Bensard at the Barbican which were both AMAZING!

Influential choreographer, dancer and opera director Lucinda Childs was an original member of the Judson Dance Theater in New York. During the early 1960’s, most independent modern dancers struggled to have their work showcased. However, as Sally Banes suggests in her book Greenwich Village 1963, the world of dance dramatically changed with the formation of the Judson Dance Theater. In her opinion, the theater was a “vital and highly visible collective that made its impact, not only on the dance world, but on the village art scene,” as well.

The theatre grew out of a dance composition class taught by Robert Dunn, a musician who had studied with John Cage. Unlike most dance troupes, the members of the Judson Dance Theater were both trained dancers, as well as, untrained visual artists, musicians, poets, and even filmmakers. On July 6, 1962 the theatre company gave its first performance, Concert of Dance #1, at the Judson Church. For the next twenty years, the Judson Dance Theater would dominate postmodern dance.

Part of the success of the theatre was due to the conscious effort of its artists to work collectively.  DANCE is a collaboration between Childs, composer Philip Glass and artist Sol LeWitt.

October 9, 2011

Unfashion by Mariana Lucia Marquez

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Fashion design, in its avant-garde form, has a disposition to become (fashionably) unfashion. In Mariana’s work, she interprets a recent show of Hussein Chalayan to explore how a performance may “succeed” by failing to live up to its idiom. Her thesis takes its cue from Jérôme Bel’s notion that symbolic failure on stage, far from undermining the performance, produces a palpable artistic surplus. Find out more at http://www.marianaluciamarquez.com

Title: Unfashion – Bonnie Bird Theatre, Trinity Laban

Choreography: Mariana Lucia Marquez

Performers:  Diina Bukareva, Alenka Herman, Emma Zangs

Sound:  Soundtrack from Hussein Chalayan’s “S/S 2003 Manifest Destiny” Show

Lighting:  Andy Hammond, Ashley Bolitho