Masao Adachi | A.K.A. Serial Killer (1969)

Continuing my research into the politicised aesthetic of Japanese film and photography in the late 60s, I have discovered (through the art of Eric Baudelaire) Masao Adachi’s ‘landscape theory’ as demostrated in A.K.A. Serial Killer  – could this be a potential avenue to explore?

Masao Adachi & Kôji Wakamatsu, both having ties to the Japanese Red Army, stopped in Lebanon on their way home from the Cannes festival. There they caught up with notorious JRA ex-pats Fusako Shigenobu and Mieko Toyama in training camps to create a newsreel-style agit-prop film based off of the “landscape theory” (fûkeiron) that Adachi and Wakamatsu had developed. The theory, most evident at work in A.K.A. Serial Killer (1969), aimed to move the emphasis of film from situations to landscapes as expression of political and economical power relations.

In 1974 Adachi left Japan and committed himself to the Palestinian Revolution and linked up with the Japan Red Army. His activities thereafter were not revealed until he was arrested and imprisoned in 1997 in Lebanon. In 2001 Adachi was extradited to Japan, and after two years of imprisonment, he was released and subsequently published Cinema/Revolution [Eiga/Kakumei], an auto-biographical account of his life.

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5 Comments to “Masao Adachi | A.K.A. Serial Killer (1969)”

  1. You’re getting in to darker territory, Dr. Dance – loving it.

  2. i really wonder how dancing and revolution are linked to each other. not sure the women and men of the (german) red army fraction (RAF) danced a lot. there’s an african proverb, that i like a lot, and that goes: if you can talk you can sing, and if you can walk you can dance. not sure what’s before making a revolution. dance?

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