Archive for ‘B&W’

July 13, 2013

The RAMPAGE continues…

RAMPAGE | The Performance of Violence and the Theatre of Protest | Tracey Fahy 2013

January 7, 2013

RIP | Shomei Tomatsu

Shomei Tomatsu
 
I was sad to learn today that Shomei Tomatsu has died.  Tomatsu was a major influence on the Provoke generation of Japanese photographers.

These young photographers, such as Takuma Nakahira and Daido Moriyama, developed a freewheeling, highly expressionistic visual style that seemed to push the individual photographic image to the edge of descriptive incoherence. Tomatsu was a proponent of this approach, though not quite as extreme as some. The important thing about the whole group, and Tomatsu also, was that the rough-hewn tone of the imagery was not simply a style or an aesthetic, but a means of registering an attitude toward the world, a stance of defiance and political protest.

Read the rest of the BJP obituary here: http://www.bjp-online.com/british-journal-of-photography/news/2234262/japanese-photography-legend-shomei-tomatsu-has-died#ixzz2HJDEXWCi

June 12, 2012

RIP | Masahisa Fukase

I was very sad to learn today that Masahisa Fukase died on 9 June.  His book Karasu (Ravens) is my all time favourite photobook; shot in in 1976 in Hokkaido in the wake of his divorce, and published in 1986.  A panel of five experts convened by the British Journal of Photography, in 2010, selected Karasu as the best photobook published between 1986 and 2009. Fukase suffered traumatic brain injury from a fall in 1992, and remained in a coma until his death earlier this month.

To quote Sean O’Hagan:

Fukase’s images are grainy, dark and impressionistic. Often, he magnifies his negatives or overexposes them, aiming all the time for mood over technical refinement. He photographs flocks from a distance, and single birds that appear like black silhouettes against grey, wintry skies. They are captured in flight, blurred and ominous, and at rest, perching on telegraph wires, trees, fences and chimneys. Fusake photographs them alive and dead, and maps their shadows in harsh sunlight and their tracks in the snow.  Ultimately, though, it seems that Fukase’s 10-year pursuit of the ravens was a way of trying to make sense of an altogether more personal emotional trauma…..read more here.

May 25, 2012

Arnold Layne | Pink Floyd (1967)

They don’t make pop videos like they used to!!  Love this theatrical promo,  Arnold Layne – the first single released by Pink Floyd. The song’s title character is a transvestite whose primary pastime is stealing women’s clothes and undergarments from washing lines. According to Roger Waters, Arnold Layne was actually based on a real person.  “Both my mother and Syd’s mother had students as lodgers because there was a girls’ college up the road so there were constantly great lines of bras and knickers on our washing lines and ‘Arnold’ or whoever he was, had bits off our washing lines.”

However, despite finding a place in the Top 20, the song’s unusual transvestism theme attracted the ire of Radio London, which deemed the song was too far-removed from “normal” society for its listeners, before eventually banning it from radio airplay altogether.

This black and white promotional film of Arnold Layne  features members of Pink Floyd dressing up a mannequin before showing it around a beach in East Wittering, West Sussex. Recently, an alternative promotional film was unearthed, which featured the band goofing around on Hampstead Heath, and also in front of St Michael’s Church in Highgate near to where the band were living at the time. It is the only known footage of Barrett lip synching to the song. Shot in the spring of 1967, around the time that Barrett had begun his mental deterioration.

May 14, 2012

Irreversible Materiality | Rethink

Pure Extraction is an experimental multimedia piece from my Rethink project.  You can read about the projects gestation on the project blog.

You can also view reference images here.

May 13, 2012

Akiko | Infinity Mirrored Room

April 6, 2012

A Man With His Head on Fire


Good Friday | Bankside, London 2012.

April 1, 2012

SONIC | Duets

February 19, 2012

Interview | Eikoh Hosoe

February 19, 2012

Kamaitachi | Eikoh Hosoe


All images © Eikoh Hosoe

Eikoh Hosoe’s long association with the revolutionary performance movement butoh came about through his encounter in 1959 with one of its founders, Tatsumi Hijikata. Hosoe collaborated with Hijikata on several series including Kamaitachi, which is acknowledged as the finest illustration of Hosoe’s hybrid photographic style, combining performance and documentary with a dramatic, virile aesthetic that embodies the founding principles of Hijikata’s ankoku butoh or ‘dance of darkness’.  The dramatic and intense energy that Hijikata generated with his dance not only captured Hosoe’s imagination but also opened up new ways for the young photographer to approach themes such as sexuality, gender and the human body.

Driven by the desire to re-enact his childhood memories when he was evacuated from Tokyo during World War Two, Hosoe had Hijikata perform kamaitachi, the legendary weasel-like demon that haunted the rice paddies in the extremely sparse, rural landscape of the Tohoku region from where they both came. Fusing reality (Hijikata interacting with the landscape and village people) and performance, Hosoe’s ‘subjective documentary’ series opened new ground in Japanese post-war photography.