Archive for ‘Events’

December 1, 2013

Iowa Blizzard | Elaine Summers

One of the most interesting works from the Intermedia Program at University of Iowa, on display at the Anti-Academy exhibition at John Hansard Gallery, was Iowa Blizzard by Elaine Summers.

Elaine Summers, a pioneer of intermedia art who merged film and dance during her association with the Judson Dance Theatre in the 1960s.  Summers first worked with Intermedia students in 1973, developing site-specific dance pieces in various locations within the city.

The Intermedia Programme at the University of Iowa was established by the German artist Hans Breder. At Intermedia, students experienced workshops by various visiting artists with an emphasis on exploring ‘the boundaries between media, between artistic and scholarly practices, between genres, between social and political universes, between viewer and artist’.  The Iowa programme was characterised by an innovative use of media and technology. Key to its early years was the involvement of visiting artists who developed work with student participation, including creations by Robert Wilson and Allan Kaprow amongst others. There was an emphasis on development of a collaborative relationship with the local community and the utilisation of the local landscape as site for the making of student work. Anti-Academy includes works made with students (notably with the year group of students that included Ana Mendieta and Charles Ray) by Elaine Summers, Mary Beth Edelson and Vito Acconci, alongside a broader review of the archive.

November 30, 2013

Anti-Academy | John Hansard Gallery

ImageAbove: Students in the class of Nakanishi Natsuyuki, Bigakkō, Tokyo, 1970, photograph Morinaga Jun.

Well worth a visit to John Hansard Gallery in Southampton to see this incredible exhibition.  You can read further info about Anti-Academy here.

Anti-Academy examines the ideas, processes, workshops and legacies of three radical educational models in 1960s Japan, the USA and Denmark. Comprised of three installations, each relating to one of these school’s programmes, Anti-Academy explores life at Bigakkō, Tokyo (installation by Yoshiko Shimada), the Intermedia Program, School of Art and Art History, at the University of Iowa (installation by Cornelia Schmidt-Bleek), and Ex-School, Copenhagen (film by Alice Maude-Roxby and Tom Chick)…….

Anti-Academy is an interpretation of how these three academies situated themselves on the peripheries of the art world, existing in opposition to the mainstream, and responding to the political and social climate, location and cultural context of the day.

Below are images from the Bigakkō installation by Yoshiko Shimada.

Bigakko can be seen to draw most directly from its current political context. Founded in 1969 by the publishing house Gendaishicho-sha, infamous in their commitment to publishing an eclectic selection of controversial contemporary Japanese writing, alongside French philosophy and political theories including the first Japanese publication of Marquis de Sade’s ‘Juliette’, Bigakko also exercised an extraordinary high-disciplined learning environment to accompany their progressive literature, including one teaching year where students were made to attend all classes. The school employed the most radical artists of the day and the teaching programme involved diverse approaches, ranging from vociferous political conferences to quiet meditation. For Gendaishicho-sha, Bigakko operated in response to the social backdrop of student revolt in the post-war climate, acting as a rejection of western modernism and a questioning of Japanese cultural and political history.

ImageAbove: Zero Yen Bill | Akasegawa Genpei
ImageAbove: Multi-positional work benches, designed by Nakamura Hiroshi and Nakanishi Natsuyuki in 1969 for Bigakkō, were intended to offer students various modes of working from kneeling on the floor to using the boxes as seats and desks.Image

Above: Chronology Wall | Installation of artefacts relating to Bigakkō history from the archives of Imaizumi Yoshihiko and Yoshiko Shimada.

A new publication accompanies the exhibition, comprehensively illustrated and with a range of essays exploring the themes and contexts of the show.

June 14, 2013

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May 4, 2013

Never Seeing Nothing (13-18 May)

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I will be showing my project Rampage in Never Seeing Nothing, part of the Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research organised by UAL Photography and Archive Research Centre (PARC).

Private view: 15th May, 2013 – 6-9pm

For more details please visit: www.neverseeingnothing.com | www.mooseontheloose.net

February 12, 2013

Backstage | Sleeping Beauty


Images taken of English National Ballet‘s male dancers preparing for Sleeping Beauty at the Coliseum last month. You can view more ballet images on my website www.traceyfahy.com.

February 10, 2013

Sleeping Beauty | English National Ballet


These images were taken back in January at Coliseum in London.

February 7, 2013

Two Ladies Cabaret | Utopia

In the old quarter, of a quiet Spanish town, lies hidden an encounter with the spirit of the 1930s!

Hotel Utopia | Benalup Casas Viejas | 2013.

October 17, 2012

Daido Moriyama | Printing Show

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I was lucky enough to attend this one-day event held at Tate Modern.  Printing Show was a rare opportunity for participants to create their own numbered limited-edition photobook by the renowned master of Japanese photography, Daido Moriyama. Each participant edited and sequenced their own copy, which was staple-bound with a silk-screened cover and signed by the artist, during this performative event. The entire book-making process happened live on site in full view. The photobook generated during this performance is entitled MENU.

Printing Show featured a menu of over 90 images from Moriyama’s oeuvre, including recent colour photographs. The event is a re-staging of DAIDO MORIYAMA PRINTING SHOW, which took place in Tokyo in 1974. Instead of mounting photographic prints on the gallery walls, Moriyama installed a photocopy machine and silk-screen printing station, generating individualised photobooks composed of photocopied sheets, staple-bound inside a silk-screened cover. Entitled Another Country in New York, the book made use of photographs that the artist shot while in New York City in the winter of 1971.

PRINTING SHOW is a Goliga project organised by Ivan Vartanian and coincides with the William Klein + Daido Moriyama exhibition at Tate Modern.
 

October 10, 2012

William Klein + Daido Moriyama | Tate Modern


I got a sneak preview of the William Klein + Daido Moriyama show at Tate Modern last night after Daido Moriyama’s talk. This really is a *must see* exhibition.  You can read a review on 1000 Words blog.

Explore modern urban life in New York and Tokyo through the photographs of William Klein and Daido Moriyama. This is the first exhibition to look at the relationship between the work of influential photographer and filmmaker Klein, and that of Moriyama, the most celebrated photographer to emerge from the Japanese Provoke movement of the 1960s.

With work from the 1950s to the present day, the exhibition demonstrates the visual affinity between their urgent, blurred and grainy style of photography and also their shared desire to convey street life and political protest, from anti-war demonstrations and gay pride marches to the effects of globalisation and urban deprivation.

The exhibition also considers the medium and dissemination of photography itself, exploring the central role of the photo-book in avant-garde photography and the pioneering use of graphic design within these publications. As well the issues of Provoke magazine in which Moriyama and his contemporaries showcased their work, the exhibition will include fashion photography from Klein’s work with Vogue and installations relating to his satirical films Mister Freedom and Who Are You Polly Maggoo?

September 9, 2012

Approaching Whiteness | Performance with Rinko Kawauchi

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Rinko Kawauchi is recognized for masterful editing and sequencing of her images and has generated a rich body of photobooks. In response to this, presenting her photography as a sequence of frames on a scroll — a form with a rich history in Japan — is a new photobook form for the photographer that draws out some of the ideas at the core of her work. The sequence of frames flow from right to left and connote the passage of time as an uninterrupted sequence. This idea extends to a larger philosophy that all things are connected.

Approaching Whiteness presents nine different sequences that each focus on a specific theme. Participants choose a scroll and selected a pattern to be silkscreened onto the underside of the scroll. Once the pattern had been printed onto the scroll, the title was written in brushstroke by a calligrapher. The photographer then stamped her seal onto the scroll before placing the object into a custom-made box and handing it to the participant. The entire process, including the silkscreening, was carried out inside the Photographers’ Gallery while the participants watched.

Total Edition: 300 scrolls

Scroll:
Height: 220 mm, Width: 2.1 meters
Recto: Digital Printing by Edition Works, Tokyo
Japanese paper by Awagami
The scroll wraps around a Katsura pole with a diameter of 44mm and 236mm in length.

Box:
66 x 66 x 255 mm, Paulownia wood
Laser-cut lettering

Approaching Whiteness is a production by Ivan Vartanian / Goliga.