Archive for ‘Events’

September 8, 2012

Shishi-Odori | Deer Dance




Oshu Kanatsu-Ryu Shishi-Odori Dance Troupe perform @ Bernie Spain Gardens, London (2012).

Shishi-Odori is a popular folk performing art in the Tohoku (north-east) region of Japan, an area struck by the Great East Japan Earthquake last year.

In the performance, dancers beat a taiko drum hung at the waist, wear carved wooden shishi-gashira (deer mask) adorned with real deer horns and carry long sasara on their backs. Handed down from generation to generation, Shishi-Odori is performed as both a way of expressing respect towards nature and praying for the repose of ancestors’ souls.

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July 19, 2012

BIG DANCE | Big Top Tent | Social Dance Day


These images were taken at the Social Dance Day at Big Top Tent @ Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich. Featuring workshops in ballroom and sequence dance, taught by Thomas Michael Voss, followed by a social dance. Again, hosted by English National Ballet, Greenwich Dance and the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

Good too see a few familiar faces there.

July 18, 2012

BIG DANCE | Big Top Tent | Cabaret Day

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Highlights from Cabaret Under Canvas last Monday @ Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich.  Featuring dance and circus acts plus a live band, hosted by Michael Nunn and William Trevitt. The Artistic Directors of Balletboyz were recently awarded OBEs in the Queen’s Jubilee Birthday Honours.

The stellar line-up of acts included English National Ballet, Luca Silvestrini’s Protein,  Olivier Award-winning Hip-Hop Dance Company Boy Blue Entertainment, Britain’s Got Talent semi-finalists Hoop La LaRambert’s youth dance company Quicksilver, Blueprint Bursary winner Cathy Waller, Matt Hennem’s Liquid Crystal, Mid-American Pom Pons, Lotus Youth Dance Company, AD Dance Company and the Levantes Dance Theatre.

Supported by the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the event is part of the Greenwich Festivals, Big Dance and the London 2012 Festival.

Big Dance is delivered by the Mayor of London, Arts Council England, Foundation for Community Dance and a network of Big Dance Hubs. The programme in London is funded by Legacy Trust UK, creating a lasting impact from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games by funding ideas and local talent to inspire creativity across the UK, with additional support from the Foundation for Sport and the Arts.

Greenwich Dance is the Big Dance Hub for South East London. The UK’s biggest ever celebration of dance ran from 18 May-15 July 2012 as part of the London 2012 Festival.

July 17, 2012

BIG DANCE | Mid-American Pom Pons


Photographs taken at Big Top Tent Cabaret Event @ Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich.
English National Ballet, Greenwich Dance and the Royal Borough of Greenwich hosted four days of Big Dance activity alongside Dance GB at the Greenwich Summer Festival.

July 15, 2012

BIG DANCE | Brazil Day

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Carnival spirit comes to Wandsworth Park in London today.

July 6, 2012

BIG DANCE | Still Moving Exhibition | 7 – 15 July 2012

This image which I took during the Still Moving project at Siobhan Davies Dance, will be in an exhibition of dance photography at City Hall cafe throughout Big Dance week, 7-15 July.

Admission FREE.

City Hall
The Queen’s Walk
London SE1 2AA

Open:

Mon- Thurs 8.30am – 6pm  |  Fri 8.30am- 5.30pm

July 5, 2012

REMINDER | Private View @ Oh! Oxford House Tonight

Irreversible Materiality is a collaboration between photographer Tracey Fahy and the Senior Dancers (age 60+) at Green Candle Dance Company based in Bethnal Green, London. Founded in 1987, by Fergus Early, with a brief to bring dance; as practice and performance to as wide a cross-section of the community as possible.

Combining hip-hop dance, photography and sound images (influenced by Japanese avant-garde culture of the late 1960s – in particular Butoh dance, which was often performed by older dancers) to create a unique visual language.

June 18, 2012

Walking Piece | Matthias Sperling

Choreographer Matthias Sperling is creating a new commission for Big Dance 2012. Walking Piece is an installation performance in which 50 people come together to form a single file loop that continuously circumnavigates Siobhan Davies Studios. Performers are taking part in the creative process along with the choreographer to develop the piece. Audience members will be invited to view the work by moving along, around and among the performers’ circular route, encountering not only different events mapped along the route, but also each performer’s individual response to those events. Based on walking, the work will set up a close interaction between performers and audience members. This series of images were taken at yesterday’s rehearsals held at Siobhan Davies Studios.  The event is happening at 12 noon on Sunday 15 July.

June 17, 2012

MAN: Astrid Andersen | Agi & Sam (S/S 13)

A joint initiative between TOPMAN and Fashion East returned to the runway yesterday for the 15th consecutive season as part of the inaugural London Collections: MEN. Having championed the best and brightest new menswear talent on the catwalk since 2005, the MAN team are delighted that British menswear has finally been awarded its own fashion week.

Following Autumn/Winter 2012’s line up of Agi & Sam, Astrid Andersen and Shaun Samson, the panel and Lulu Kennedy  have invited the trio to return and show their S/S 13 collections. Shaun Samson shows on the MAN catwalk for a third time, while Agi & Sam and Astrid Andersen return following a highly successful debut and having previously proved themselves at the Fashion East Menswear Installation.

Designers are selected by a panel of industry experts including Mr Porter’s Sam Lobban, Arena’s Andrew Davis and GQ Style’s Ben Reardon. Mentoring the designers, the panel play a crucial role in fast tracking their brands, helping them onto such schemes as the British Fashion Council’s LONDON show ROOMS in Paris and New York.

May 19, 2012

Eric Baudelaire | The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images

Images: The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images, 2011 © Eric Baudelaire.

This exhibition and related events are well worth checking out at Gasworks, London.

The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images is the first UK solo exhibition by French artist Eric Baudelaire.

Baudelaire’s most recent work looks at the complexities of recounting the history of the Japanese Red Army (JRA) – a radical group that emerged from the 1968 Tokyo student movement, settled in Beirut in the early 1970s, and engaged in sophisticated terrorist activities in solidarity with the Palestinian cause.

The exhibition consists of an installation encompassing his 2011 experimental documentary film of the same name, which centres upon the oral testimonies of two JRA protagonists: May Shigenobu, the daughter of JRA founder and leader Fusako Shigenobu, and Masao Adachi, a legendary underground film director, JRA member and theoretician. This is shown alongside documents, photographs, prison drawings and works on paper that further contextualise the JRA’s radical journey, focusing on issues of representation associated with documentary, testimony and the production or absence of images. The Anabasis… engages with questions concerning the relationship between politics and film, and militant filmmaking versus activism without cinema – a distinction that Masao Adachi refuses, but that Baudelaire’s exhibition interrogates anew.

Baudelaire frames the story of the JRA in a literary tradition going back to Xenophon’s Anabasis: a journey of soldiers lost in foreign lands, wandering into the unknown on a circuitous journey home. In recounting their own journeys, May Shigenobu and Masao Adachi weave together intimate stories, political history, revolutionary propaganda and film theory. They each describe clandestine and imageless experiences in which images are nonetheless constantly at stake. May Shigenobu, for instance, spent much of her early life in hiding, often living under pseudonyms. When family snapshots were occasionally taken they were always then hastily destroyed. As she grew older, returned to Japan and started working as a television journalist, images began to provide her with a new means of self-invention.

As a filmmaker, Adachi devoted his life to images. During his years in Lebanon, he sought to advance his radical film practice by trading the camera for the rifle. Yet all the while he remained a filmmaker at heart, even conceiving of JRA aeroplane highjackings as screenplays. The scenarios were his own, the actors were JRA fighters, but the cinematography was left to the news cameras.

May Shigenobu’s and Masao Adachi’s stories unfold over new ‘fûkeiron’ Super 8 images filmed by Baudelaire in Tokyo and Beirut. Fûkeiron is a ‘theory of landscape’ developed by Adachi for his 1969 film AKA Serial Killer, an excerpt of which is also included in the exhibition. Through filming landscapes, he sought to reveal the structures of oppression that underpin the political system and cause alienation. The Anabasis… puts this theory to work and also turns it back towards its author, exploring the problematic overlaps between images of reality and those of fiction, and between a radical political engagement and an unsettling fascination with violence.