Posts tagged ‘art’

February 19, 2013

Independent Dance


Last week I was invited by Independent Dance to take photos, at their professional morning class with Katye Coe, for their new summer brochure at Siobhan Davies Dance Studios in London.  Above, are some images from this shoot.

Independent Dance (ID) is an artist-led organisation providing a responsive framework to support, sustain and stimulate dance artists in their ongoing development as professionals. It provides a specialist and coherent programme offering opportunities to learn, deepen enquiry, share practice and exchange ideas as part of an interdependent international community.

February 17, 2013

Matthew Barney | DRAWING RESTRAINT

The ongoing DRAWING RESTRAINT series began in 1987 as a series of studio experiments, drawing upon an athletic model of development in which growth occurs only through restraint: the muscle encounters resistance, becomes engorged and is broken down, and in healing becomes stronger. In literally restraining the body while attempting to make a drawing, DRAWING RESTRAINT 1–6 (1987–89) were documentations made using video and photography. DRAWING RESTRAINT 7 marks the influx of narrative and characterization, resulting in a three channel video and a series of drawings and photographs, for which Barney was awarded the Aperto Prize in the 1993 Venice Biennale.

Matthew Barney is an American artist who works in sculpture, photography, drawing and film.

July 29, 2012

INSPIRATION | Liz Rhodes: Light Music

Images: Light Music | Liz Rhodes @ The Tanks, Tate Modern 2012.

Light Music is an innovative work presented originally as a performance that experiments with celluloid and sound to push the formal, spatial and performative boundaries of cinema. An iconic work of expanded cinema, it creates a more central and participatory role for the viewer within a dynamic, immersive environment.

Formed from two projections facing one another on opposite screens, Light Music is Rhodes’s response to what she perceived as the lack of attention paid to women composers in European music. She composed a ‘score’ comprised of drawings that form abstract patterns of black and white lines onscreen. The drawings are printed onto the optical edge of the filmstrip. As the bands of light and dark pass through the projector they are ‘read’ as audio, creating an intense soundtrack, forming a direct, indexical relationship between the sonic and the visual. What one hears is the aural equivalent to the flickering patterns on the screens.

Light Music is projected into a hazy room – the beams that traverse one another in the space between the two projections become ethereal sculptural forms comprised of light, shadow and theatrical smoke. This format is designed to encourage viewers to move between the screens, directly engaging with the projection beams, forming a set of social relations in which cinema is transformed into a collective event without a single point of focus. Light Music occupies an important threshold in film history, drawing on early experiments in ‘visual music’ from the 1920s by pioneers including Oskar Fischinger, Hans Richter and Walther Ruttmann, and subsequently opening cinematic practice up to a host of concerns from gender politics to phenomenological experience.

Lis Rhodes (born 1942, London) is a major figure in the history of artists’ filmmaking in Britain and was a leading member of the influential London Filmmakers’ Co-op.

July 6, 2012

BIG DANCE | Still Moving Exhibition | 7 – 15 July 2012

This image which I took during the Still Moving project at Siobhan Davies Dance, will be in an exhibition of dance photography at City Hall cafe throughout Big Dance week, 7-15 July.

Admission FREE.

City Hall
The Queen’s Walk
London SE1 2AA

Open:

Mon- Thurs 8.30am – 6pm  |  Fri 8.30am- 5.30pm

July 5, 2012

REMINDER | Private View @ Oh! Oxford House Tonight

Irreversible Materiality is a collaboration between photographer Tracey Fahy and the Senior Dancers (age 60+) at Green Candle Dance Company based in Bethnal Green, London. Founded in 1987, by Fergus Early, with a brief to bring dance; as practice and performance to as wide a cross-section of the community as possible.

Combining hip-hop dance, photography and sound images (influenced by Japanese avant-garde culture of the late 1960s – in particular Butoh dance, which was often performed by older dancers) to create a unique visual language.

June 6, 2012

Exhibition @ Oh! Oxford House

Irreversible Materiality is a collaboration between photographer Tracey Fahy and the Senior Dancers (age 60+) at Green Candle Dance Company based in Bethnal Green, London. Founded in 1987, by Fergus Early, with a brief to bring dance; as practice and performance to as wide a cross-section of the community as possible.

Combining hip-hop dance, photography and sound (influenced by Japanese avant-garde culture of the late 1960s – in particular Butoh dance, which was often performed by older dancers) to create a unique sonic visual language.

May 25, 2012

Arnold Layne v David Noonan?

Is anyone else seeing this connection?


© David Noonan/Photographer: Unknown.

May 13, 2012

Akiko | Infinity Mirrored Room

February 19, 2012

Kamaitachi | Eikoh Hosoe


All images © Eikoh Hosoe

Eikoh Hosoe’s long association with the revolutionary performance movement butoh came about through his encounter in 1959 with one of its founders, Tatsumi Hijikata. Hosoe collaborated with Hijikata on several series including Kamaitachi, which is acknowledged as the finest illustration of Hosoe’s hybrid photographic style, combining performance and documentary with a dramatic, virile aesthetic that embodies the founding principles of Hijikata’s ankoku butoh or ‘dance of darkness’.  The dramatic and intense energy that Hijikata generated with his dance not only captured Hosoe’s imagination but also opened up new ways for the young photographer to approach themes such as sexuality, gender and the human body.

Driven by the desire to re-enact his childhood memories when he was evacuated from Tokyo during World War Two, Hosoe had Hijikata perform kamaitachi, the legendary weasel-like demon that haunted the rice paddies in the extremely sparse, rural landscape of the Tohoku region from where they both came. Fusing reality (Hijikata interacting with the landscape and village people) and performance, Hosoe’s ‘subjective documentary’ series opened new ground in Japanese post-war photography.

February 7, 2012

PROVOKE | Daido Moryiama

© Daido Moriyama. Selection of images from the Provoke era.