Posts tagged ‘New York’

February 14, 2013

Inspiration | Ballet by Alexey Brodovitch

Alexey Brodovitch‘s Ballet published in 1945 is one of the most legendary of photobook masterpieces. While already established as a leading influential art director and graphic designer, Brodovitch turned his photographic talents towards rehearsals and performances of ballet companies visiting New York stages. Shot in 35mm and disregarding traditional conventions of “good” technique, Brodovitch pushed the boundaries of description to create a panorama of images that perfectly captures the motion and spirit of dance. Books on Books #11 reproduces every dynamic page spread from this rarely seen volume along with a contemporary essay written by leading Brodovitch scholar Kerry William Purcell.

This book is published by www.errataeditions.com

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October 10, 2012

William Klein + Daido Moriyama | Tate Modern


I got a sneak preview of the William Klein + Daido Moriyama show at Tate Modern last night after Daido Moriyama’s talk. This really is a *must see* exhibition.  You can read a review on 1000 Words blog.

Explore modern urban life in New York and Tokyo through the photographs of William Klein and Daido Moriyama. This is the first exhibition to look at the relationship between the work of influential photographer and filmmaker Klein, and that of Moriyama, the most celebrated photographer to emerge from the Japanese Provoke movement of the 1960s.

With work from the 1950s to the present day, the exhibition demonstrates the visual affinity between their urgent, blurred and grainy style of photography and also their shared desire to convey street life and political protest, from anti-war demonstrations and gay pride marches to the effects of globalisation and urban deprivation.

The exhibition also considers the medium and dissemination of photography itself, exploring the central role of the photo-book in avant-garde photography and the pioneering use of graphic design within these publications. As well the issues of Provoke magazine in which Moriyama and his contemporaries showcased their work, the exhibition will include fashion photography from Klein’s work with Vogue and installations relating to his satirical films Mister Freedom and Who Are You Polly Maggoo?

October 22, 2011

Lucinda Childs


Just got back from seeing the 1979 revival of DANCE by Lucinda Childs and the movie Lucinda Childs by French director Patrick Bensard at the Barbican which were both AMAZING!

Influential choreographer, dancer and opera director Lucinda Childs was an original member of the Judson Dance Theater in New York. During the early 1960’s, most independent modern dancers struggled to have their work showcased. However, as Sally Banes suggests in her book Greenwich Village 1963, the world of dance dramatically changed with the formation of the Judson Dance Theater. In her opinion, the theater was a “vital and highly visible collective that made its impact, not only on the dance world, but on the village art scene,” as well.

The theatre grew out of a dance composition class taught by Robert Dunn, a musician who had studied with John Cage. Unlike most dance troupes, the members of the Judson Dance Theater were both trained dancers, as well as, untrained visual artists, musicians, poets, and even filmmakers. On July 6, 1962 the theatre company gave its first performance, Concert of Dance #1, at the Judson Church. For the next twenty years, the Judson Dance Theater would dominate postmodern dance.

Part of the success of the theatre was due to the conscious effort of its artists to work collectively.  DANCE is a collaboration between Childs, composer Philip Glass and artist Sol LeWitt.